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20130103
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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
the way, he developed a literary curiosity that pivots from dystopian visions of science fiction to the 19th century classic novel, "moby dick." in captain ahab's whaling crew, men of every race are thrown together in pursuit of the elusive and the mythical. diaz sees in this a parable of america then and now. he teaches creative writing at m.i.t. and recently received a prestigious macarthur fellowship, the well-known and coveted "genius grant." junot diaz, welcome. >> oh, thank you for having me. >> well, i've wanted to have you, because i've wanted to ask one of america's foremost storytellers, "what's the story you're telling yourself out of this election?" >> whew, it was bananas watching that election. but i think probably the thing that comes out most forcefully after the election is how little people were expecting the voting, the sort of, the electoral body that made obama's victory possible. i mean, i think there was -- no one was talking about the sort of numbers that showed up for obama. no one was predicting the diversity of the vote. no one was predicting that sort of the rep
. you say that this is unsound science and potentially could lead to problems. why do you believe that there is not a value in at least looking at this gunman's dna? >> well, first of all, let me say that my heart goes out to all the people in newtown, connecticut. this was an horrific series of events. second of all, the major problem that i have as a geneticist is that it's impossible to gain much information with the sample size of one. so what you are looking at is one person's dna, and you're trying to say that it's different than other people. but you only have a sample size of one. >> would it be helpful, do you think, to look at the dna of other shooters of those from previous mass shootings? >> well, again, the problem is, we have probably less than five or even ten people that we're talking about. when studies -- accurate genetic studies are done on a whole population, we look for hundreds of different people, and you have to show a strong correlation with that. and the second problem would be what are we trying to look for? i mean, we're going -- the whole idea is you'r
coulter, it will smash your house. this is about internalizing science and making the science become part of the cultural vocabulary. the problem with the right-wing agenda with this huge cloud of disinformation is people are very naive and the arts can help and catalyze an emotional discussion. the numbers are speaking. we have had record level drought, we have record-level firestorms, and storms. colorado, texas, the list goes on of places that have been hammered. you have to be foolish, someone like george bush to not process that. you have -- it is incredible. you still have to point out, your house is on fire. you are like, really? that is my take on it as a downtown dj. >> the last question on the left. >> thank you. part of what you said about the gift giving economy. an anthropologist wrote a book on the gift economy and wrote another book on "the ethnography of direct action" which touched on things that happened with occupy. with social movement, the eupepsia -- maybe you can speak to a -- going toward reaction and fizzling out? or you see this accelerating, moving from a creati
math metically, where science ends, the part that makes you feel good but you don't know why, the way the object feels and looks and you can almost if it's perfectly created explain it to somebody else afterwards but in the creation part you can't. you can see how the glass is constantly moving. my job is to basically shape it. and balance it at the same time. you do that, you get these wonderful shapes, glass really rewards the risk. lot of times with glass you're waiting for the piece to cool down and temperature to adjust and split seconds where you've got a fraction of a second to make a particular move in a particular way and you don't get to repeat it if could you it wrong so there's a performance to it. it's sort of like dancing. you can't really think about it and do it really. you just have to do it enough that it becomes sort of mechanical, and then you can sort of free your mind to design. ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. make it worth watching. introducing the 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. >>> a member of the paparazzi is de
as a result of a fall. the cheaf science and health correspondent has more on the secretary's condition. we said potentially life-threatening and in this case it's not. they are confident the thinning medications make it okay. >> she is on the phone making calls is reassuring. it's not life-threatening and it didn't become a stroke. if the blood clot was not dissolved, blood could leak back into the brain. that would cause stroke-like symptoms or a stroke itself and she would have trouble speaking and clearly that's not happening. >> when she was first lady back in 1998, she had severe pain behind her right knew. she had a blood clot there. are the two at all connected? can they be? >> there is. this is a rare side effect. usually when they get a brain bleed, it's inside the brain. this is outside in a blood vessel. this happens and it is seen by the same mri that would see the brains there. that may have been the case with her. that might have been why she had this mri. the question is, people who have a propensity to blood clotting and some women in particular, yes, they are more likely t
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. bikes and balloons, wholesome noodles on spoons. a kite, a breeze, a dunk of grilled cheese. catches and throws, and spaghettio's. that's what happy kids are made of. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> we're back with more on that breaking news. secretary of state hillary clinton has been released from the hospital. this is new video of clinton's motorcade leaving the hospital just a short time ago. she had been there since sunday recovering from a blood clot in her head. doctors now say she's making good progress on all fronts and they're confident she'll make a good recovery. this is great news. and now that mrs. clinton is out of the hospital, we're waiting on an apology from the right wing. after news broke two weeks ago that clinton suffered a concussion after fainting, they went on the attack. >> you don't want to go to a meeting or a conference or an event, you have a diplomatic illness. >> why don't we apply the same standards we apply to school kids. i want to see a doc
things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. ♪ oh beautiful for spacious skies for amber waves of grain ♪ ♪ for purple mountains majesty ♪ above the fruited plain ♪ america america god shed his grace on thee ♪ ♪ and crown thy good >> our gaggle here was almost unanimous in naming that ad as one of the most memorable and effective ads of the 2012 campaign. that's saying something in a race where nearly a billion dollars was spent on advertising alone in the presidential race. it's tough to stand out. we're all back, what was interesting here, kevin and stephanie, is both of you picked that ad as the most effective and both of you on the democratic side, and you both picked the most effective ad on the republican side. here it is. >> he tried, you tried. it's okay to make a change. >> so, i thought that was interesting. it's almost like you're respecting the other's work. kevin, you picked the america the beautiful. what -- >> i remember when that ad came out, it was previ
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ let's stay together >>> when you look at this picture, what do you think? at what point was it taken? >> i think we were campaigning in iowa. >> so why were you hugging her so hard in iowa? >> because i love my wife. >> and also, i hadn't seen him in a while. when you're campaigning, we're two ships passing in the night. and the first time i saw him was when i walked on stage to greet him. and that's my honey giving me a hug. >> how do you keep the fire going? >> that's a good question. >> you know, we've been married now 20 years. >> mm-hmm. >> like every marriage, i think, you know, you have your ups and you have your downs. but if you work through the tough times, the respect and love that you feel deepens. >> and then there's a lot of laughter, you know. >> and you're funnier. >> yeah. for the most part. >> everybody thinks he's pretty funny. i'm funnier than people think. >> you are. >> that may be. you may be funnier than people think. >> barbara walters in th
was at 5. their science is so much more superior to everybody else's when it comes to this macular degeneration, i think the stock -- buy buy buy, is going to 200. mike until nebraska? >> caller: happy new year, boo-yah, jim. >> same. >> caller: win -- >> no, i'm not convinced. i don't like these other companies that are, that started out as wireline companies to try to do more. it's not good enough. broadband, to me it's not working, you can stick with it but i don't like it. matt in new york? >> caller: boo-yah, thanks for taking my call, jim. >> what's going on? >> caller: i'm getting into stocks. i'm wondering what your opinion is on. >> which one? >> nike, nke? >> i think nike is terrific. i believe in the return in china, north america, doing terrifically. splits the stock, it's a $50 stock, i think it can go to $60. glen in virginia? >> caller: jim, i'm a long-time listener i want to thank you for helping me get back to even sometime ago. >> you're terrific for saying that, thank you so much. howky help? >> caller: i'm retired living on dividends, my favorite stock is triang
of science, 50, 100 and 150 years from now. thank you so much for being with us from new york city this morning. guest: it's my pleasure. host: we now go to the floor of house of representatives. that's all for "washington journal" this morning. the house is in for morning hour and at noon for legislative usiness. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's rooms, washington, d.c. january 2, 2013. i hereby appoint the honorable david rivera to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists smithed by the majority and minority leaders -- submitted by majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and minority whip limited to five minutes e
and financing, if you look at the statistics are round or they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading, you can see where the problem is. today, they were in the number 27, 28, and so on. productivity generally is the x factor that accommodates for 60% of why one country grows and another does not. generally, it includes things like political dynamic, so we know what is happening there. that is not my prediction. look at this framework, capital, labor, productivity. you will see why i am incredibly bullish. in terms of capital, these economies by a large did not have the debt burden that other countries are facing right now. why is that important? these countries are not suffering from a deal leveraging problem. 60%-70% is under the age of 25. in you got there, over 50% is under the age of 15. we can talk about that once i sit down. once again, a really interesting story. they were talking about 30% increases over goods and services. in virtually all statistics, things like political improvements and freedoms, this is really essential. countries like rwanda have been ranke
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financialor literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations.ra and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation forr public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> mike: from paint to pet food, hats to barbecue. as a nation, we make millions of products every year. but have you ever wondered just how those things are made and what drives those companies? tonight in this "n.b.r." special edition "made in america" we go to towns small and large to meet unique businesses building jobs and profits. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." good evening, i'm mike hegedus with an n.b.r. special edition, made in america. walking down kentucky street in downtown petaluma, california, but it could be anywhere, u.s.a. this is where sm
provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
. accord fog the institute of medical science in south korea, thank you, south korea, asparagus and the minerals found in there extract -- it helps filter. that is why your pee sometimes smells different after you -- i'm just saying. >> and we have plenty of unique polkas this past year. this one started with our maestro, barry mitchell. ♪ who needs flowers, who needs sweets ♪ ♪ it's the valentine's polka ♪ seems like just the 1% are making all the bucks ♪ ♪ like the vampire said the economy sure sucks ♪ ♪ that's the paula polka everyone sing. ♪ that's the paula polka ♪ we love to read your comments always in such a large amount ♪ ♪ you like us, we like you, it's the facebook polka ♪ ♪ it's late at night, you're wide awake and you're not wearing pants ♪ ♪ so everybody dance ♪ that's the "world news now" polka ♪ yeah! >>> this morning on "world news now," urgent meeting. the president orders lawmakers to top level negotiations to avoid the fiscal cliff. >> it's just four days until a pending financial fiasco that would cost every single america
. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
of the arts in favor of science, in favor of technology but it strikes me that what you just said and the context of the book and the fact that we still have the sort of need for the untold stories for the dark secrets is indicative of a kind of historical illiteracilliterac y that exists in our country and that african-americans and that black history in africana history itself with the subject that is most unknown or he raced from our collective consciousness. do you think that historical illiteracy contributes to our present and even to our future? do you see the larger story that you tell here as essential to your vision of the country we ought to live in? >> i don't know that i have thought about it in that way. what i definitely thought about was how reflective her family was of the american story and i wanted very much to imbue it with the history so that people could see that her family had front row seats to some of the most important moments in our history slavery, civil war emancipation, the migration, jim crow, the depression and that all their steps forward and steps
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. stuart: the market rallies on this fiscal close the deal. we have not spoken to anyone who really likes this deal. is this a deal that you can love as an american citizen? >> no, of course i do not love it. no one in washington has the slightest idea where a job comes from. a job comes from a business owner. have some profit and heat decides to expand his production. it is a real shame that we have the fed standing there to backstop. it is a shame that we have such a large percentage that is the beneficiary of government spending. our politicians should be getting punished right now. stuart: you hate it as a citizen. you are a traitor. you will make money out of it, won't you? >> i happen to like the crude oil market. it is looking up today. i suppose that would be a positive. my job is to come here on a day-to-day basis, just because the market is up, i may have made some money. i could have been short. it does make me sick. our politicians in washington should be punished. stuart: you tell it how you see it. we like it. joining u
% in 2011. if you went into nursing 30 years ago, you didn't anticipate this. that's what happens as science e evolves and things change. requirements change. >> i want to talk about another subject because everybody is talking about it. the hannah storm, the fire that explodes from the girl. what happened in that situation to her? a lot of people think is this uncommon to be in that kind of situation where it's dangerous and don't realize the gas is on and v an explosion. >> you have the gas on, and you think it's lit. what happened in this situation is she came back and it wasn't lit. she went to relight it and all of this propane had been gathering during that time. propane is heavy, and it was just sitting there. of course, you can't see it, but she was not lighting just a small amount of gas at that point. she was unknowingly lighting a large amount of gas and han explangs. when you light a propane grill and if it goes out and doesn't work, you can't just relight it immediately because you've got much more gas in front of you you. >> we're looking at the pictures of the injuries, the bu
than politics. art, culture, religion, science, philosophy, sports. whether the empire got it right last week, whether or not the nature of dark matter is going to be first discovered by michael businesses rather than astrophysicists. this is all part of speech and thought that is protected by the first amendment. can't think of it just in political terms. then there's a third dimension, that speech is what allows you to define your persona and your personality. your speech, your thoughts, your belief, are who you are. and this is an essential human right. now, the supreme court in its first amendment case has protected speech. that is habeas -- habeas. we only get those cases. [laughter] >> we had a case recently protecting speech, video where there was described to me, i never look at these things, women in spiked heels killing little animals. we protected that. it was protected speech. we protected speech on the day of a funeral of a servicemen killed in the middle east. there were protesters and using derogatory words about gays, saying that the military would be doomed because
is something they are not able to do. someone who is getting a bachelor of science in nursing can afford to take on more debt than someone getting a degree in religious studies or a low income field. it does not mean you should abandon the degree. it means you should pay attention to the debt, because you may abandon the dream later. >> not all the trees are worth as much is something those of us -- all degrees are worth as much is something those of us who love liberal arts in the united states have a hard time coming to grips with. >> or journalism. >> is -- it obviously makes people uncomfortable that the situation is further curtailed by the family were born into. if you are a wonderful high school student, you have to think more about your major and your college than a student born into a wealthy family. how do you balance that with the reality of this crisis. >> one of the things we do at the national consumer law center is direct representation of low- income borrowers as well as speak to thousands of borrowers throughout the country. we do see the effect of this threw out the cou
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "squawk box." shares of marvell technology falling this morning. company says they're going to seek to overturn a jury's patent infringement finding. yesterday a federal jury found marvell infringed two patents held by carnegie mellon. the chipmaker has been ordered to pay $1.2 billion in damages. another big payday maybe for -- >> lawyers. >> now to the winter storm slamming the east coast. the weather channel's reynolds wolf joins us now with more. is this one named, reynolds? >> this one is indeed named. this one is given the name euclid. go figure. i say that spells trouble. it's certainly going to spell trouble for people trying to travel out of new york. you look at this color code behind us, where you happen to see the orange and the yellow. just like on a traffic light you're going to have a little bit of caution there. but ground travel at least air travel may come to a screeching halt in places like boston, portland, maine, mind you and even i
department of public safety to have a special agent from the eye or a division of investigation from science to investigate misconduct. the agent is conducting multiple investigations into the ballot fraud, voting by individuals who are ineligible and the double voting. since august of 2012 they have been filed in the conduct cases based on information received from my staff, the local election officials and members of the public. anyone who says voter fraud does not exist should like the numbers produced in the short months. we all know that criminal investigations take time and we expect more charges related to the misconduct to be filed in the coming months. in our efforts to insure integrity my office has taken several steps to maintain accurate voting lists in order to prevent people from taking advantage and election system. first, iowa has won numerous states participating in the project. the purpose of which is to identify voters that may be registered or voting in more than one state. second, i love match of the voting registration records with the social security administration mor
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)